Work intensity in men and work-related emotional demands in women are associated with increased suicidality among persons attending primary care

Journal of affective disorders, 2018, sous presse

suicideN Younès (1,2), M Rivière (3,4), L Plancke (5), A Leroyer (6), T Blanchon (3), M Azevedo Da Silva (1,3), M Melchior (3). Work intensity in men and work-related emotional demands in women are associated with increased suicidality among persons attending primary care, Journal of affective disorders, sous presse

A large proportion of persons died by suicide are employed at the time of death and work-related factors partly contribute to suicide risk. Our aim was to examine the association between multiple aspects of work organization and suicidal ideation in a study conducted in primary care.

Data came from a study of 2,027 working patients attending a GP representative of patients in the Nord Pas-de-Calais region in France (April-August 2014). Suicidality was assessed using the MINI (Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview). Six emergent worked-related factors were explored (work intensity, emotional demands, autonomy, social relationships at work, conflict of values, insecurity of work). Several covariates were considered: patient’s and GP’s characteristics, and area-level data (material and social deprivation, psychiatrist and GPs’ density, suicide attempts and suicide rates)

8.0% of participants reported suicidal ideation in the preceding month (7.5% of men and 8.6% of women, p=.03). In multivariate analyses adjusted for covariates, suicidality was significantly associated with work intensity (OR= 1.65; 95%CI [1.18 – 2.31]) in men and with work-related emotional demands (OR = 1.35; 95%CI [1.01 – 1.80]) in women. Area-level data were not associated.

Limitations. Our cross-sectional study cannot assess the direction of the relationships under study.

Our results emphasise a central role for GPs in suicide prevention among workers and highlight the importance of work-related factors with regard to suicidality in primary care.


1 EA 40-47 University of Versailles Saint-Quentin, Versailles, France

2 Academic Unit of psychiatry for adults, Versailles Hospital, Versailles, France

3 Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, Institut Pierre Louis d'épidémiologie et de Santé Publique (IPLESP UMRS 1136), F75013, Paris, France

4 Department of Infectious Diseases, Centre Hospitalier Régional, Orléans, France

5 Fédération régionale de recherche en psychiatrie et santé mentale Hauts-de-France, Lille, France

6 Univ. Lille, CHU Lille, Institut Pasteur de Lille, EA 4483 - IMPECS – IMPact de l’Environnement Chimique sur la Santé humaine, F-59000 Lille, France